Tate Britain Gallery: Highlights

Tate Britain

During my London trip, I had the pleasure of visiting all the major art galleries in the city.

I was like a kid in a candy shop :)

Of course I didn’t buy any art, but I did take THOUSANDS of photos!

I took photos of the entrances! Of the floors! Of the corridors! The art. The didactic panels. The frames. The doors. The spaces. The negative spaces. Haha I truly enjoyed every little detail.

I didn’t plan to share any of it on my blog, because seriously, even I think I over did it.

However, I do want to share these snaps from the Tate Britain Art Gallery, home of British art from the 1500s to present day.

Tate Britain

Close up of Portrait of Elizabeth I (1563) by Steven van der Meulen and Steven van Herwijck.

This is the earliest known full-length portrait of the queen. Here’s the link to the full portrait. It’s gorgeous!!

Although it looks yellow here, the background was “gold” paint and had a stunning, satin sheen to it… making the whole painting shimmer.

If I paid money to get my portrait done, I’d want something OVER THE TOP like this too haha.

Tate Britain

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885–6) by John Singer Sargent

I don’t know much about John Singer Sargent, except that he was a famous portrait artist based in London/Europe and he used to hang out with Monet and the other Impressionist dudes.

I recognised this painting from a high school art book (over 20 years ago), and yep… it is more amazing, more staggeringly beautiful and more mind-blowingly impressive in real life.

I have no words.

Tate Britain

Study of Mme Gautreau (1884) by John Singer Sargent

This is the sketch (yes a sketch!) of Sargent’s infamous painting Madame X, which caused such a huge controversy in Paris at the time that it damaged Sargent’s reputation as a portrait artist, and as a result, he decided to move to London. The rest of the painting can be seen here.

Whatever the case, it is a stunning study, and I would kill to be able to “sketch” like that!

So inspiring!

Don’t know about you, but I want to crack open my charcoals after all this…

London’s Natural History Museum : Highlights

Natural History Museum London

I was going to save my “first visit” to the Natural History Museum for when I was in London with my kids.

 

They love all this Natural World kind of stuff!

Me? I don’t really like looking at dead, stuffed animals, so why put myself through the pain of seeing it all twice?

As it turned out, the museum was very cool and I really enjoyed myself.

Yes there were lots of stuffed animals.

But I had a couple of WOW moments too. Especially with the dinosaur bones.

Say what?

You’d think that after raising 3 boys, who were obsessed about dinosaurs, that I’d be pretty bored by them. Nope.

Natural History Museum London

This dinosaur skeleton was aaaaamazing.

It is the most intact and complete Stegosaurus fossil skeleton ever found.

It was presented so well –  its pose, height, directional lighting to capture its texture, the colour of the light.

Even though it was just propped up on a white platform, it was so engaging and compelling. It made my jaw fall to the floor in awe, and it made my imagination come alive!

Natural History Museum London

I also loved the specimens of deep sea fish – So weird and alien looking!

The stuffed dodo – Looked like an enormous chicken!

The swarm of hummingbirds – So tiny and beautiful!

I guess I will be taking my kids after all, and seeing it all again haha.

Tate Modern: Highlights

This was my second visit to the Tate Modern Art Gallery – the first time was 14 years ago, when I was last in London with my husband.

I was going to skip it, but it was a cold, grey day and my mum and I needed to get out of the house.

I was a bit hesitant to take my mum – an Asian lady in her early 70s – because I wasn’t sure if she’d like all that “MODERN ART”.

When I was in Tasmania, I visited the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) and there was a very long wall with a row of plaster cast vaginas set just above eye level. 30 of them maybe? They were um, interesting. But I secretly prayed that there wouldn’t be anything too CONFRONTATIONAL like that at the Tate haha.

Thank goodness there were only just a bunch of Picasso’s and Pollock’s there!

Tate Modern - Mondrain

Ah modern art, you crazy thing you.

Mondrian always makes me chuckle. I know he is regarded as a genius. But I always imagine him thinking, OK let’s have some fun and see if I can get away with this one…..

Apparently the colour, structure and placement of the elements within the picture is meant to represent an ethical view of society.

Composition C (No.III) with Red, Yellow and Blue (1935), by Piet Mondrian

Tate Modern - Picasso

Ok I had a special moment with this one.

Picasso has such a huge and remarkable body of work, across so many mediums. He’s a really impressive artist. And when you stare into his paintings they can be quite moving.

Especially this one!

Weeping Woman (1937) by Pablo Picasso.

From the display caption: One of the worst atrocities of the Spanish Civil War was the bombing of the Basque town of Guernica by the German air force, lending their support to the Nationalist forces of General Franco. Picasso responded to the massacre by painting the vast mural Guernica, and for months afterwards he made subsidiary paintings based on one of the figures in the mural: a weeping woman holding her dead child. Weeping Woman is the last and most elaborate of the series. The woman’s features are based on Picasso’s lover Dora Maar.

Some of my favourite Picasso paintings are the Guernica and Weeping Woman. So it was amazing to see this one in real life.

Tate Modern - Dali

Autumnal Cannibalism (1936) by Salvador Dalí

I don’t know much about Dali, only that he knocked out some kooky-weird stuff.

I remember in art school, we had to do drawings in a Dalí style and it was actually really hard to deliberately discard all the “rules” of perspective, scale, form. It seriously messed with my head haha.

Tate Modern - Pollock

Number 14 (1951) by Jackson Pollock

Even though Pollock’s work is ridiculously messy, abstract and random, I quite like it.

But mainly because I can imagine how FUN it would be to throw / squirt / splatter / pour / make an almighty mess with all that paint!

It’s kind of exciting to stare into all that randomness.

Tate Modern - Warhol

Marilyn Diptych (1962) by Andy Warhol.

Hmm, I’ve never been a fan of Andy.

But he did make a significant impact on art, film, music, pop culture, art culture in the 60s so I had to take a photo for my kids to see.

Tate Modern - Duchamp

Fountain (1917, replica 1964) by Marcel Duchamp

My mum scoffed at this one.

I’m a bit on the fence with it.

If you read the convoluted story behind it on the Tate website (quite interesting!), you can decide whether Duchamp was just being an ass, arrogantly trying to prove a point, honestly trying to make people stop and think, pissing off the Society of Independent Artists (of which he himself founded!), or being a witty / humorous / clever artist.

Dunno.

Overall, I had yet another wonderful day, slowly perusing through the art galleries in London. Bliss!

What I was most amazed by was the fact that almost all the good stuff was completely free. There is no official entry fee into all the big galleries, but they do encourage you to give a small donation. Love that.

Sweet Peas at the British Museum

British Museum - Snowpeas

I bumped into this beautiful artwork at the British Museum.

The lines, shapes, composition and detail just blew me away, so I’m sharing it here on my blog, more for my own inspiration.

It is a woodblock print called Picture Album of Western Plants (1917) by Tanigami Konan.

The didactic panel says, “Modern Japanese designers and artists took special interest in Western plants, particularly during the 1910s, as the international Art Nouveau style became popular, with its flowing curves based on natural forms. This volume is from a set of richly printed books depicting flowers of the four seasons. The table of contents gives for each flower the English name and its Asian equivalent. The delicate blossoms here are sweet peas. Colour woodblock illustrated book.”

It’s the kind of print that I’d love to have on my wall so I can look at it every day.

And it’s also the kind of sketch I’d love to have done myself… and I know it’s possible for me, I just need a bit of practice! One day!

What I Wore: Tate Modern

London

When the kids are all grown up, I’ve decided that my husband and I are going to do an Art Gallery Crawl across all the major cities of the world! #LIFEGOALS

I haven’t told him yet. However I might have to negotiate with him because he’d probably want to drag me to all the maritime and war museums too. And um, I don’t know if I’m up for that.

But what a life that will be right? Haha!

Yes the days have been cold and I’m actually enjoying all this rugging up in 4-5 layers thing.

I think I might actually miss it.

Here’s what I wore while traipsing through the Tate Modern.

I won’t be getting points for fashion creativity, but hey I was warm.

Uniqlo Heattech Singlet – I didn’t think it at first, but these are so handy for a bit of extra warmth without the bulk.

Grana White Linen Shirt – Not ironed and crumpled from being stuffed in my luggage, of course.

Uniqlo Cotton Cashmere Grey Sweater – These are no longer on sale, but here’s a similar Grana Crew Neck Cashmere Knit.

Topshop Double Breasted Coat – Oh man, this coat was so nice and affordable that I wished it came in a navy or dark grey. It comes in a Pink Blush and Light Grey, and I already have coats in those colours. They’re on 20% sale if you’re keen!

Frame Le Color Skinny Jeans – As I mentioned before, I pretty much lived in these jeans haha.

Rebecca Minkoff Julian Backpack – Great size for travelling and spending all day out and about.

Acne Pistol Boots – You know when you’ve bought well when you crack a quite smile whenever you put that item on. I’ll be smiling for years with these babies.